Services

MIAM (Mediation Information and Assessment Meeting.)

If you need to make an application to court, you are required by the court to have met with a family mediator to discuss whether the issues can be resolved through mediation or other forms of dispute resolution instead of court. This meeting is referred to as a MIAM – or Mediation Information and Assessment Meeting. In certain circumstances there are exceptions to attend a MIAM .

At the MIAM the mediator explains what mediation is and other forms of dispute resolution, what is involved if you  decide to proceed with mediation and how it can help you . It is also to find out from each of you in confidence about your current situation and what you want to resolve as well as to find out about any concerns you may have.
You have the choice of coming together to a MIAM, and if you do you are each seen separately during the course of the meeting and what you tell the mediator is confidential or to have a completely separate meeting on your own if you prefer.

You can decide whether or not you wish to go ahead with mediation and your mediator will also let you know whether in their professional opinion mediation should proceed.

 

Forms for Court

If after the MIAM you or the mediator decide mediation is not the way forward or the other person involved is not willing to consider mediation, you or your solicitor will be provided with a form signed by a mediator, which is proof to the court that you have considered mediation. You will not be able to make your application to court without the form . You will also be provided with this form if you try mediation but mediation doesn’t work out or some issues are left unresolved and you need to make an application to court.

 

Mediation

The first step

 

Before you start mediation the first step is to have a mediation information and assessment meeting or MIAM. This is so you and the mediator can decide whether mediation will be the best the way forward in your situation.

At the MIAM the mediator explains what mediation is as well as other ways to resolve matters, what is involved if you decide to proceed with mediation and how it can help you . It is also to find out from each of you in confidence about your current situation and what you to sort out as well as to find out about any concerns you may have.

You have the choice of coming together to a MIAM, and if you do you are each seen separately during the course of the meeting and what you tell the mediator is confidential or to have a completely separate meeting if you prefer.

You can decide whether or not you wish to go ahead with mediation. The mediator will also let you know whether in their professional opinion mediation should proceed.

 

The next steps

 

You and your mediator will arrange a mutually convenient time for a mediation meeting so the issues can be considered in detail. Each meeting usually lasts for up to one and half hours. Your mediator will have explained to you at the MAIM what you need to do to prepare for mediation, such as gathering together financial information or thinking about ideas for the future arrangements for the children.

 

First mediation meeting

 

You will decide on the issues you want to consider and resolve in mediation. You’ll begin to explore the issues and agree on any urgent matters concerning the children and or finances. Usually your mediator provides you with an outcome summary of the mediation meeting so it is clear what has been proposed and considered, as well as what needs to be done in preparation for the next meeting and the date of the next meeting.

 

Second and subsequent meetings

 

For children’s only issues
 
The average number of meetings is between two to three. You may agree matters at the first or second session and want to come back for a further meeting to see how matters have progressed and whether anything needs to be reconsidered. Usually your mediator provides you with an outcome summary of the mediation meeting so it is clear what has been proposed and considered or needs to be done in preparation for the next meeting and the date of the next meeting.
 
For financial matters
 

There are usually between three to five meetings. You will be considering your financial information and exploring options at these meetings. The mediator will provide a summary of the financial information disclosed in mediation as well as preparing an outcome summary of the mediation meeting so it is clear what has been proposed and considered, what needs to be done in preparation for the next meeting and the date of the next meeting.

When final proposals are reached the mediator will send you a financial summary and a memorandum of understanding which sets out your proposals in detail. Your mediator will explain how your proposals can become legally binding.

 

Giving children a voice

We may raise the possibility of involving your children in mediation.
If you and the mediator decide that seeing the children will be helpful this will be carefully planned with you in advance. A meeting will be held with both parents to consider why your children might meet with the mediator and to be clear about the expectations and safeguards of this process. The children will be invited to meet with the mediator and if they wish to come a separate meeting will be arranged with the mediator. After the mediator has seen the children there is a meeting with both parents on another occasion to consider any feedback from their children.

 

Divorce Coaching

I provide one to one guidance, support and coaching to help you manage the emotional, legal, financial and parenting aspects of separation, as well as planning your future. Whether you are in are in the middle of your divorce or haven’t yet decided to do anything divorce coaching will help you find, reassurance,clarity and direction. Phone me for a free chat to see how I can help you or follow this link to find out more:
www.janebusby.com

 

Professional Practice Consultancy

Jane Busby is available for professional practice consultancy to supervise and assist new mediator’s achieve accreditation and supervision of experienced mediators. Jane has been a professional practice consultant since 2003 having worked with supervisees in large and small services in both the charitable and private sectors.

Consultant in Direct Consultation with children in mediation

This is a service offered to other mediation practices whose mediators are not trained in seeing children in mediation. Please contact Jane Busby for more details if you are interested in this service.